JUSP Community Survey 2016

JUSP logo

One of Evidence Base’s bread and butter jobs is to conduct the annual user survey for JUSP, which is the Jisc specialist resource for university or further education college librarians. JUSP tells them about the use of on-line journals or e-books that they have purchased or to which they have subscribed. By using JUSP a librarian can find out whether a certain journal or e-book has been used and how many times. In the old days, when everything was paper it was easy to work out if books had been taken out of the library, and if journals were looking well thumbed, or still in pristine condition because no-one had looked at them. E-resources are a different, with all sorts of possible metrics available you can find out if something has or hasn’t been downloaded, and from which IP address. Of course, it does mean that someone, somewhere has to collect and collate that information. Briefly, JUSP works by using SUSHI to harvest COUNTER statistics and it will then give you reports about the resources used by your institution. Currently, JUSP has a “Journal” portal and an “e-book” portal. If you have no idea what SUSHI and COUNTER mean, don’t worry about it, they are simply a means to an end and I will devote whole posts to explaining them in the future. Meanwhile, back to the survey…

survey

We finished the JUSP community survey at the end of last December, and the full report is now ready to read here: http://jusp.jisc.ac.uk/news/jusp-community-survey-2016-report.pdf . The results of the report showed that JUSP is a much wanted resource for university and college librarians which adds value to their service, provides them with reliable data and saves them time (somewhere in the region of 7 hours work a month). One commented JUSP has a “hugely positive impact on staff time… freed up for analysis rather than finding and downloading data files”.  Many respondents thought that JUSP was vital to their service because without it they would have to take staff away from other tasks; one even thought that they would not use usage statistics any more if JUSP did not exist.

Of the journal statistics that JUSP can calculate, the most vital one appeared to be “Journal Report 1 (JR1)” which can tell you the number of requests there has been for one specific journal per month, over a period of time which you can select. Users of JUSP use the Journal portal statistics for a range of tasks:

  • Ad-hoc reporting
  • SCONUL reporting
  • Considering subscription renewals
  • Answering general enquiries
  • Finding evidence to prove access rights
  • General annual statistics
  • Evaluating deals with publishers
  • Benchmarking against organisations
  • To put a list of “top ten journals” on the website
  • To search for anomalies in their data

E-book portal is less used, it is still in development and does not contain statistics from many e-book suppliers used by many of the libraries. Librarians can get the statistics that they need directly from the publishers. However, respondents did think that e-book statistics are important and the ones who do use JUSPs e-book portal (just less than half the respondents) use Book Reports 2 and 3 (BR2, BR3) in order to find out the number of times an e-book has been requested per month over a selected period of time (BR2) or the number of times access has been denied to an e-book (BR3). When a library users asks for a certain e-book, only to discover that they cannot access it indicates that the library does not subscribe to or has not purchased that e-book. Librarians like to know this so that they can understand what their customers want. So, our respondents tolde-book us that they use e-book statistics for:

  • Collection development
  • Choosing which subscriptions to renew
  • To see how the full collection is being used
  • To make purchasing decisions
  • To calculate cost per download

Overall, the JUSP users were satisfied with the service that it provides and they praised the JUSP team for the support that it gives to users. Some very appreciative clients there, so university and  college librarians out there who are not using JUSP, take a look at it, you may benefit from its use.

G4HE webinar

One of the projects we are currently working on is hosting a free webinar on 22nd October. See the details below to find out if it’s something you may be interested in attending. 

G4HE logo

G4HE logo

Are you a research manager, administrator, or researcher? Wonder who you could be collaborating with? The G4HE project (Gateway for Higher Education) is a Jisc-funded project with the aim of improving access for HEIs to information held by the Research Councils, by giving something useful in return for all the effort that goes into creating, maintaining, and collecting this research information. It uses the BIS-funded RCUK Gateway to Research API to retrieve the data they collect from institutional research management systems like Research Fish and ROS. Using this data, the G4HE tools have been developed to help Higher Education institutions (HEIs) answer questions such as:

  • Which other HEIs did my institution collaborate with last year and how much value did those collaborations bring in?
  • Are there other HEIs working in a similar area that we could collaborate with in future?
  • How does the value of our research compare with other institutions or research groups?

G4HE is hosting a free webinar to introduce you to the tools being developed and consider how these could be used in institutions. The webinar is on 22nd October 2013 from 1pm until 2pm – book your place now at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/event/8548036407.

IRUS-UK new users survey feedback

IRUS logo

IRUS logo

Evidence Base is responsible for community engagement on the IRUS-UK project, a Jisc-funded project developing a statistics service for repositories in UK Further and Higher Education institutions. As part of the community engagement, we survey new joiners to the service to get her their first impressions, collect ideas and suggestions, and discover the areas they need more support with. Their feedback informs the technical development and guidance and support aspects of the project:

  • Technical development – we keep a technical wishlist based on user feedback, and review this at monthly team meetings to prioritise development work.
  • Guidance and support materials – we work with other members of the IRUS-UK team to provide relevant help and guidance for using IRUS. User feedback helps us focus our efforts on guidance for the areas that need it most.

As we are moving to the second year of IRUS-UK, we produced a summary of the key themes from the user survey so far. This included benefits and challenges, the way people use IRUS-UK and other repository statistics, their views on the open data approach, benchmarking, and feedback on specific features of IRUS-UK. The table below demonstrates some of the ways we have responded to feedback from these surveys:

IRUS-UK response to user feedback

IRUS-UK response to user feedback

Community input to IRUS-UK is something which is highly valued, and we will continue to collect feedback from the community on a regular basis. The summary report is now available from the News page of the IRUS website.

JUSP Community Survey 2012

JUSP logo

JUSP logo

As part of our ongoing community engagement and feedback collection activities we would like to invite all Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) users to take part in a community survey. We would welcome your opinion on a number of aspects of JUSP to help make improvements and inform future development.

We are offering entry into a prize draw to win a £50 Amazon voucher to all who complete the survey. Details of how to enter are at the end of the survey.

The survey should take around 10 to 15 minutes to complete. All data collected in the survey will be held anonymously and securely. Personal details, where supplied, will not be passed to any third party. Cookies and personal data stored by your web browser are not used in this survey. We would welcome your responses by 7th June 2012.

The online survey is available at: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/juspsurvey2012

We have also have a PDF version of the survey for you to print if you wish to discuss it with colleagues. If you have any colleagues who may be interested in completing it themselves, please feel free to forward the survey link to them.

If you have any queries about the survey please contact ebase@bcu.ac.uk

Many thanks in advance for your time. We value your opinion – it really does make a difference.

Can you help the LIS RiLIES project?

The LIS RiLIES project (Research in Librarianship – Impact Evaluation Study) is looking at the impact of funded librarianship projects on LIS practitioners. As a follow up to their survey (results here), the project is now interested in hearing from anyone who has used research in day-to-day practice, or maybe as a starting point for a new project or to help develop a report or paper.

One of the projects chosen is Evidence Base’s Evalued toolkit to help with evaluation of electronic information sources. LIS RiLIES has spoken to Evidence Base about the project, but are now interested to hear from anyone who has used the toolkit.

Here’s a full list of the projects:

  • The study on public library policy and social exclusion Open To All coordinated by Dave Muddiman and reported back in 2000.
  • The eValued project in which Pete Dalton and others developed a toolkit to support library and information services staff in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in the evaluation of electronic information services (EIS). This work was completed between 2004 and 2006.
  • The Research Information Network’s (RIN) 2006 study into Researchers’ use of academic libraries funded by RIN and CURL and completed by Key Perspectives.
  • The Future of school libraries project carried out by Sue Shaper and David Streatfield for CILIP’s School Libraries Group. This reported its results in 2010.
  • The project entitled Evaluating the impact of clinical librarian services led by Alison Brettle and the North West (England) healthcare librarians group in 2009.

If you have used any of these in practice, please use the contact form on the LIS RiLIES blog post to let them know.

27 Questions addressed by the JISC Information Environment programme

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From 姒儿喵喵 on Flickr

As evaluators for the JISC Information Environment programme we are currently involved in pulling together the main lessons learned from the programme. One of the outcomes, which we produced to accompany the end of programme event at Aston University last month, is a series of questions and answers which the programme has addressed. This features some of the highlights from the programme and some of the institutional concerns that have been addressed by the programme.

The questions are now available on the JISC website. This is intended to be a live document until the end of the programme (July), so please contact me or post a comment here if you have any comments or suggestions.